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Nobel-winning Mexican scientist calls for complete ban on fuel oil

REUTERS- August 7, 2020
“Fuel oil should be banned,” said Molina in an interview last week. “Crude oil is obsolete, and even more so fuel oil, which also has very serious problems related to air contamination.”

Earth 2020: Science, society, and sustainability in the Anthropocene

PNAS -April 21, 2020
Another critical scientific advance occurred in the mid-1970s, when Mario Molina and F. Sherwood Rowland first demonstrated that chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) would break down under UV exposure in the stratosphere, releasing free radicals that catalyzed ozone destruction. The pair would go on to share the 1995 Nobel Prize in Chemistry with Paul Crutzen.

In utero ultrafine particulate matter exposure causes offspring pulmonary immunosuppression

Early life exposure to fine particulate matter (PM) in air is associated with infant respiratory disease and childhood asthma, but limited epidemiological data exist concerning the impacts of ultrafine particles (UFPs) on the etiology of childhood respiratory disease.

Commentary | Why California summit is make or break for climate safety

Opinion piece by VEERABHADRAN RAMANATHAN. MARIO MOLINA & DURWOOD J. ZAELKE
Gov. Jerry Brown’s climate summit next week is his last chance — and perhaps the last chances for the U.S. and the world — to change the course we’re on in time to prevent climate devastation. Benignly called the “business as usual” climate trajectory, this course should be called the “disaster” trajectory because that’s where it’s taking the planet, and far faster than most realize.

A Nobel Prize-winning chemist shares his studies with the world

Dr. Mario Molina of Mexico is one of the most celebrated scientists alive today. He is an atmospheric chemist who was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1995.

Mexico City seeks pragmatic solutions to transport pollution

“We assume that an air quality emergency in the 1990s was the same as now, but it isn’t,” says Antonio Mediavilla, project co-ordinator at the Centro Mario Molina, a leading environmental think-tank in Mexico City named after its founder, a Mexican chemist who shared the Nobel Prize in 1995 for identifying the role of chlorofluorocarbons on the ozone layer. “Air quality has improved significantly since the 1990s . . . but it’s still not ideal.”

Nobel laureate teaches the tricky work of talking about climate change

When Mario Molina won the Nobel Prize in 1995 for his research on CFCs, the award came with a new responsibility: To communicate science and influence policy.

Stopping an environmental disaster before it’s too late. How UC research sounded the alarm on the ozone layer.

In 1974, two experts in atmospheric chemistry from UC Irvine, Mario Molina and F. Sherwood Rowland, made international headlines with their discovery that the widespread use of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) in aerosol spray cans was destroying the Earth’s ozone layer, the shield that protects us from harmful ultraviolet radiation.

MEXICO LEADERSHIP CORPS TRAINING: THE FIRST STEP TO CLIMATE ACTION

Throughout the training, participants had the opportunity to learn from renowned speakers, such as chemist Dr. Mario Molina, who was the first Mexico-born person to win the Nobel Prize in Chemistry in 1995. Dr. Molina, who is now a professor of chemistry and biochemistry at the University of California San Diego, gave an insightful presentation on science and policy and reminded trainees about society’s responsibility to tackle climate change.

UC San Diego Nobel Laureate in Chemistry Named to California Hall of Fame – SIO

Gov. Edmund G. “Jerry” Brown and First Lady Anne Gust Brown, in partnership with the California Museum, recently announced inductees of the 11th Class of the California Hall of Fame. Among the new members is Mario Molina, a University of California San Diego distinguished professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biochemisty and Scripps Institution of Oceanography.



MARIO MOLINA CENTER FOR STRATEGIC STUDIES ON ENERGY AND THE ENVIRONMENT
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